Board

Executive Board

The DEC Executive Board is comprised of the Division’s current officers, immediate past Chair and three Executive Counselors. The Board forms policies for the Division, provides advice and decides the budget for the Division, and approve committee chairs. The Division Chair will convene the Executive Board.

Roles of the Executive Board positions

  • The Chair will provide executive direction for the Division and will preside over Division meetings.
  • The Chair or their designee will serve as liaison with the ASC Annual Meeting Program to ensure the inclusion of panels relating to issues on corrections and sentencing in the program.
  • The Chair or their designee shall bring issues regarding research using experimental methods, as decided by the Division, to the attention of the ASC Executive Board and to appropriate ASC committees for their consideration.
  • The Chair will appoint all committees and committee chairs, with the approval of the Executive Board.
  • The Vice-Chair will preside over Division meetings in the absence of the Chair and shall be empowered to conduct all necessary business of the Division if the office of Chair is vacant or if the Chair is unable to serve.
  • The Vice-Chair or their designee will be responsible for assistance to, and oversight of, the Newsletter Committee.
  • The Secretary/Treasurer will keep the records and minutes of the Division.
  • The Secretary/Treasurer will record minutes of each meeting of the Division and will forward a copy to each member of the Executive Committee and the Newsletter Committee Chair for publication in the next issue of the Division newsletter.
  • The Secretary/Treasurer will remain in contact with the Treasurer of ASC who will maintain a separate account in the ASC treasury for the Division. The Secretary will inform Division membership of the Divisions balance, debts, credits, etc. at the Divisions Annual Membership Meeting. The Secretary will notify the Executive Board of any financial issues that arise between Annual Membership Meetings.
  • There will be three Executive Counselors, elected in alternating years.
  • Executive Counselors will assist the Chair with executive decisions for the Division, and each will chair at least one committee of the Division.

Karen Amendola PhD
President

Karen Amendola, PhD

President

Karen L. Amendola, PhD is Chief Behavioral Scientist at the Police Foundation where she has worked for over two decades. Karen earned her PhD in Psychology at George Mason University where she specialized in Industrial/Organizational Psychology and conducted research on mentoring relationships in organizations, general aviation and driving safety, and focused on the Assessment Center method for promoting (and hiring) public safety personnel. Her dissertation was entitled “Rationalized Justifications as Determinants of Permissive Attitudes and Unethical Conduct: Measurement and Validation.” Dr. Amendola and her colleagues were awarded the Outstanding Experimental Field Trial by the Division of Experimental Criminology in 2012 for their study on the impact of 8-, 10-, and 12-hour shifts in policing, and in which they found that the 10-hour shift offered advantages over 8-hour shifts (more sleep, less overtime worked) without the fatiguing impacts of 12-hour shifts. Karen’s primary research interests are in officer safety and wellness, mindfulness, and eyewitness identification, as well as hiring, promotional, and performance assessment procedures.

Jordan Hyatt, PhD
Vice President

Jordan Hyatt, PhD

Vice President

Jordan M. Hyatt is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminology and Justice Studies, Drexel University. Hyatt’s research in corrections and reentry focuses on the evaluation of innovative criminal justice interventions with an emphasis on randomized experiments. Through the program assessments with strong partnerships with practitioners, Hyatt works to develop effective and actionable criminal justice policies. Hyatt’s work is relevant for agencies with policy agendas focused on improving reintegration, public safety, and implementing evidence-based policies.

Elisa Sargeant
Secretary/Treasurer

Elise B Sargeant, PhD

Secretary/Treasurer

Elise B. Sargeant, PhD is a Lecturer and Researcher at the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice and the Griffith Criminology Institute at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. Elise completed her PhD in Criminology at the University of Queensland where her research focused on the spatial clustering of perceptions of police in Australia. The title of her dissertation was “Policing and collective efficacy: The way police effectiveness, legitimacy and police strategies explain variations in collective efficacy”. Elise recently received the 2017 Paul Bourke Award for Early Career Research. This award honours Australian social scientists in the early part of their career who have achieved excellence in scholarship in one or more fields of the social sciences and is presented by the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. Elise’s primary research interests include procedural justice, policing, neighbourhood effects and field experiments.

Emma Antrobus, PhD
Executive Counselor

Emma Antrobus, PhD

Executive Counselor

Emma Antrobus, PhD is a Criminology Lecturer and researcher with the Australia Research Council Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life Course in the School of Social Science at the University of Queensland. Emma earned her PhD in social psychology at the School of Psychology at the University of Queensland, where she specialized in juror decision-making, particularly relating to child witnesses and evidence presentation. Her dissertation was entitled “Perceptions of Child Witnesses in the Australian Courtroom: The Impact of Recent Legal Initiatives”. Emma was the winner of the Academy of Experimental Criminology Young Experimental Scholar award in 2016 for her work in experimental trials with police, which focus on police activities and public perceptions of police. Emma’s primary interests surround police behavior and legitimacy, crime prevention, and youth deviance.

John MacDonald, PhD
Executive Counselor

John MacDonald, PhD

Executive Counselor

Professor MacDonald focuses primarily on the study of crime and violence, race and ethnic disparities in criminal justice, and the effect of public policy responses on crime. In 2012 he received the David N. Kershaw Award from the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. The award honors scholars who under the age of 40 have made a distinguished contribution to the field of public policy analysis and management.

Travis Taniguchi, PhD
Executive Counselor

Travis Taniguchi, PhD

Executive Counselor

Travis Taniguchi, PhD is a Research Criminologist at RTI International where he has worked since 2014. Prior to RTI, Dr. Taniguchi worked at the Police Foundation as a Senior Research Associate. Travis earned his PhD in Criminal Justice from Temple University. His dissertation work was titled “Policing a negotiated world: An empirical assessment of the ecological theory of policing” Dr. Taniguchi and colleagues were awarded the 2013 Award for Outstanding Experimental Field Trial for evaluating the impacts of foot patrol in Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Taniguchi’s research interests include understanding police effectiveness, determining the impact of police tactics, and studying the effects of environment and place on crime.