The Division of Experimental Criminology

dec-aecThe Division of Experimental Criminology (DEC) is one of 8 divisions in the American Society of Criminology. The DEC seeks to promote and improve the use and development of experimental evidence and methods in the advancement of criminological theory and evidence-based crime policy.

The DEC recognizes outstanding achievements in experimental criminology through the Jerry Lee Lifetime Achievement Award, the Award for Outstanding Experimental Field Trial, and the Student Paper Award.

Nominations for the 2016 awards are now closed.  We congratulate all of the winners and other worthy applicants.  We look forward to honoring our winners at the 2016 ASC Annual Meeting in New Orleans!

Join us in New Orleans!  

new-orleans-vintage-postcard

This year, the DEC & AEC will be hosting a single, joint session.  The Awards Ceremony and Joan McCord Award Lecture will be held on Wednesday, November 16, in the Hilton Exhibition Center HEC C, 2nd Level from 2:00 to 3:20 PM.

The Academy of Experimental Criminology

The Academy of Experimental Criminology (AEC) was founded in 1998 in order to recognize criminologists who have successfully led randomized, controlled, field experiments in criminology.

The AEC recognizes outstanding achievements in experimental criminology through the election of Fellows and Honorary Fellows as well as the Joan McCord Award and the Young Experimental Scholar Award.

DEC-AEC Memorandum of Understanding

Recent publications by DEC members related to experiments:

  • Weisburd, D., and C. Gill. (2014). Block randomized trials at places: Rethinking the limitations of small N experiments. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 30, 97-112.
  • Hyatt, J. M., & Barnes, G. C. (2014). An Experimental Evaluation of the Impact of Intensive Supervision on the Recidivism of High-Risk Probationers. Crime & Delinquency.
  • Maimon, D., M. Alper, M. Cukeir, and B. Sobesto. (2014). Restrictive deterrent effects of a warning banner in an attacked computer system. Criminology, 52, 33-59.
  • Welsh, B.C., A.A. Braga, and G.J.N. Bruinsma (Eds.) (2013). Experimental criminology: Prospects for advancing science and public policy. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Mazerolle, L., S. Bennett, J. Davis, E. Sargeant, and M. Manning. (2013). Procedural justice and police legitimacy: a systematic review of the research evidence. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 9(3), 245-274.
  • Prendergast, M.L., F.S. Pearson, D. Podus, Z.K. Hamilton, and L. Greenwell. (2013). The Andrews’ principles of risk, needs, and responsivity as applied in drug treatment programs: meta-analysis of crime and drug use outcomes. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 9(3), 275-300.
  • Sherman, L.W. (2013). How CONSORT could improve treatment measurement: A comment on “Developing a reporting guideline for social and psychological intervention trials.” Journal of Experimental Criminology, 9(3), 369-373.
  • Wilson, D.B. (2013). Comment on “Developing a reporting guideline for social and psychological intervention trials.” Journal of Experimental Criminology, 9(3), 375-377.
  • Higginson, A., and L. Mazerolle. (2013). Reporting guidelines for social and psychological intervention trials: considering the special context of crime and justice interventions. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 9(3), 379-384.
  • Welsh, B., Braga, A., and Bruinsma, G. (2013). New perspectives and developments in experimental criminology. Policing. doi:10.1093/police/pat020
  • James, L., Vila, B., and Daratha, K. (2013). Results from experimental trials testing participant responses to White, Hispanic and Black suspects in high-fidelity deadly force judgment and decision-making simulations. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 9(2), 189-212.
  • Koper, C., Taylor, B. and Woods, D. (2013). A randomized test of initial and residual deterrence from directed patrols and use of license plate readers at crime hot spots. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 9(2), 213-244.